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Bodegas Iranzo Spartico Sulfites-Free Spanish Natural Wine


Rating: 85/100 Factors

‘Spartico’ cuvée is made by natural Spanish vineyard Bodegas Iranzo within the Utiel-Requena D.O. space (Denominación de Origen) close to town of Valencia by the Mediterranean Coast.

This isn’t solely an natural wine made out of 50 % Tempranillo and 50% Cabernet Sauvignon grapes, however it’s also extra importantly a wine that comprises no detectable sulfites.

Grapes are sourced from the FINCA CAÑADA HONDA Property positioned about 800 to 850 meters above sea degree (2700 ft.).

With no ageing in oak through the winemaking course of, this wine is supposed to be drunk at a younger age, inside 1-2 years after harvest.

Beneficial meals pairings embrace Spanish cheeses similar to Manchego, Tapas, roasted meats and barbecues, stews, or pasta with spicy crimson sauce.

Vineyards of Bodegas Iranzo in Spain

Spartico is distributed within the US by Pure Retailers Inc and is a wine appropriate for vegan.

General Evaluation Notes & Tasting Impressions

A juicy Spanish crimson, dry and with a crisp salivating acidity.

Flavors are bursting with blackberry and darkish cherry, however the vibrant crispiness retains the expertise in a full of life round-bodied freshness.

A wealth of darkish chocolate flavors and peppery spices add some welcome depth, to an satisfying well-rounded, well-made juicy dry crimson bursting with intense fruity flavors.

A food-friendly wine to be paired with tasty dishes, barbecues, tapas and salads.

Take pleasure in 🙂

Julien Miquel

Associated Iranzo Wine Evaluation

2014 Bodegas Iranzo Tarantas Natural Tempranillo Crianza, Valencia, Spain

Bodegas Iranzo Spartico Label Pictures

2017 Bodegas Iranzo Vertvs Premium Spanish Tempranillo Cabernet Sauvignon Crimson Mix, Valencia


Rating: 86/100

Vertvs by Bodegas Iranzo is constructed from 50% Cabernet Sauvignon and 50% Tempranillo grapes grown organically on the FINCA CAÑADA HONDA property across the Utiel-Requena appellation space, at about 800 – 850 meters above sea degree in North-Jap Spain.

The fermentation is managed at a most temperature of 28ºC. This an natural wine in addition to a wine appropriate for vegans.

Vertus Tempranillo-Cabernet is constructed from USDA Nationwide Natural Program Licensed Grapes (ECOCERT) and comes beneath the Valencia D.O. appellation of origin.

Vertvs is distributed within the US by Pure Retailers Inc.

General Evaluate Notes & Tasting Impressions

This Spanish crimson is available in a vibrant crimson a coloration, intensified by deep purple hues that mirror the purple decorations on the label and packaging properly.

The fragrant profile is equally vibrant, crammed with contemporary darkish blackberry and raspberry notes. Chocolate and oaky vanilla give a way of generosity to the nostril, and a candy and ripe fruity enchantment.

This can be a dry and juicy crimson, on a medium physique however that bursts with vigorous ripe crimson berry flavors. Tannins are fairly smooth, properly rounded by a little bit of an oily texture, whereas the end evolves in direction of edgy and salty phenolics that make you salivate and provides a salivating barely salty aftertaste.

A juicy and vigorous natural crimson wine that includes nice acidity and clear vibrancy of crimson berry flavors. It guarantees to be a food-friendly juice, approachable and fulfilling on many tasty dishes such s grilled meats, tapas, natural stews, and pasta.

Take pleasure in 🙂

Julien Miquel

Study extra about this wine’s producing vineyard with Bodegas Iranzo Producer Profile

Iranzo Vertus Tempranillo Cabernet Label Pictures

2014 Bodegas Iranzo Vertus Tempranillo Crianza Premium Spanish Natural Wine


Rating: 89/100 Factors

Vertvs Ciranza by Bodegas Iranzo is produced from 100% Tempranillo grapes grown organically on the FINCA CAÑADA HONDA property across the Utiel-Requena appellation space in North-Japanese Spain.

Solely indigenous yeasts are used throughout vinification making this an natural wine in addition to a wine appropriate for vegans.

Vertus Ciranza is produced from USDA Nationwide Natural Program Licensed Grapes (ECOCERT) and comes underneath the Valencia D.O. appellation of origin.

Vertvs is distributed within the US by Pure Retailers Inc.

General Tasting Notes & Impressions

With a sustained crimson colour crammed with touches of orange hues, and a little bit of a hazy look, this Spanish Tempranillo shines with vibrant aromas of orange blossom and orange peel, intense raspberry notes and a minty/black pepper, like pepper mint spiciness to the nostril.

Tannins are comfortable mellowed by a spherical and clean physique. This can be a dry crimson bursting with intense citrusy notes of grapefruit and lemon, but in addition an enormous burst of candy spices and vanilla from what tastes like a stable ageing in used barrels, probably underneath the robust affect of American oak.

Flavors are intense and explode on the palate with intent and depth, though the wine all the time feels clean enjoyably caressing your style buds. The tannins do purchase a little bit of a velvety granulous edge in direction of the end giving it character and a salivating savory really feel.

A effectively made Spanish wine, infused with the highly effective and characterful character of Tempranillo aged in oak and with some evolution. A heap of advanced fruit characters and lifted by deep and slightly advanced notes of vanilla, clove, pepper and different spices, all combining right into a long-lasting and punchy tasting expertise like we like and considerably count on from an oak-aged Spanish Tempranillo.

Meals Pairing?

Pair with wealthy and flavorsome meat dishes, barbecue, spiced up tapas, chorizo sausage, salads and natural Mediterranean meals.

Get pleasure from 🙂

Julien Miquel

Study extra about this wine’s producing vineyard with Bodegas Iranzo Producer Profile

Iranzo Vertus Crianza Label Photographs

Bodegas Iranzo Niña Bonita Natural Crimson Spanish Sangria, Valencia

Niña Bonita crimson Sangria is made in Spain solely from natural components, together with:

  • 60% Spanish crimson wine produced from natural grapes
  • 22% Natural crimson grapes should (grape juice)
  • 16% Natural white grapes should
  • 1% Natural concentrated orange juice
  • 1% Natural concentrated lemon juice.

Notably, it comes at a comparatively low eight% alcohol (abv.).

Being made utilizing indigenous yeasts solely (the pure wild yeasts from the grapes), it’s appropriate for vegans.  Niña Bonita was produced from USDA Nationwide Natural Program Licensed Grapes, additionally Licensed by the European natural program ECOCERT – Spain.

This sangria was made by Spanish Bodegas Iranzo in Caudete de la Fuentes within the province of Valencia on the Mediterranean coast, and is distributed within the US by Pure Retailers Inc.

General Tasting Impressions

A tasty and really citrus crisp crimson sangria that includes w wealth of zesty orange and lemon fragrant profile, mixed with notes of contemporary grapes giving a vibrant fruitiness.

The palate is gentle and somewhat candy, however nicely balanced by a salivating and mineral acidity. An explosion of citrus in your mouth, on a lightweight physique and a refreshing really feel that makes of this Nina Bonita Sangria each a tasty and simple refreshing sip.

Get pleasure from 🙂

Julien Miquel

Discover out extra and purchase Niña Bonita Sangria at naturalmerchants.com

Iranzo Niña Bonita Sangria Label Photos

Spanish Wines (Rioja Wines)

Spain stands out as the third largest producer of wine after France and Italy. The Northeastern part of Spain that is the Rioja Region produces one of the best Spanish wines. This is divided into three geographical zones that happen to be Rioja Alta, Rioja Baja, and Rioja Alavesa. Each zone has its own unique flavor of grapes. The climate and quality in the soil in each of these three subzones influences the category and also the character of its grapes. Rioja wine is made with a blend of grapes from different subzones. Tempranillo grapes are the commonest form of grapes which are made with Rioja wines.

This is what gives its distinguishable flavor.  Tempranillo grapes are combined with Grenache grapes or Mazeulo grapes. Grenache doesn’t have that fruity taste and its alcohol content is higher. Rioja Wines are available in three classifications and they are the Crianza, Reserva and the Gran Reserva.

Crianza is probably the most affordable one and is viewed as table wine. What they typically do is age this for only a year inside the oak barrel and another year in the bottle. You could get this for five or ten US dollars. Now, let us talk about Reserva. This is aged at least one year inside the barrel and two years inside the bottle.  This will amount to around eleven to fifteen US dollars. Aging for the Gran Reserva is completed with all the wine staying in the barrel for two years then in the bottle for 3 years.

This generally is a bit pricey. Unfortunately the Gran Reserva is not offered every year. It is much better that you retain several bottles for special occasions. Rioja wine is often the Spanish version of the Italian Chianti. This sort of wine is best-known for its unique flavor.

Now, the Rioja wine is considered one of the most well-liked wines in the world.

Finding your way among Spanish wines Part I: Location

Article by Ana Cuesta

So, you have asked for the restaurant’s wine list (or were handled one by default) and now need find your way on it… not that hard, really.The first thing you’ll notice is that the list is divided, after the gross Blancos/Tintos (white/red), in sections headed by a name that seems to be some sort of geographical indication, and indeed it is (some sort).

They are what we call Denominación de Origen (Designation of Origin). In this regulated world, for a wine to be ascribed to a particular Denominación de Origen, it has to come from within precise geographical boundaries and also abide to some rules set by the regulating council that controls the DO.

These indicate which kind of grapes can be used (the varieties of grape are not always indicated in the label, probably because they can be easily inferred from the DO), the techniques and processes allowed or not to grow the grapes and produce the wines, etc. (they go as far as to put limits to the yields achieved, so excess wine cannot be labelled under the DO). That way, a certain homogeneity in quality and style of the wine can be assured so you know what to expect when ordering a Rioja or a Ribera del Duero (often called in short a Ribera). Real aficionados rely more on the producer than on the DO, though.

Rioja and Ribera del Duero are probably the best-known Spanish DOs. Rioja used to be almost a synonymous of Spanish quality wine, and Ribera del Duero has grown in the last 25 years as a solid alternative. Both use basically the same red grape, called Tempranillo in Rioja and Tinta Fina en Ribera del Duero. Between the two of them accumulate a myriad of prices and recognitions and host already mythical wines such as Vega Sicilia Único (R. del Duero), Marqués de Murrieta Ygay (Rioja) or Pingus (R. del Duero, the Spanish wine with the most expensive tag).

They are certainly not the only ones, though. Spain counts 64 Denominaciones de Origen in which mainly red but also white wines (as well as some rosés) are produced.

Some may be less widely know because of their smaller production but give wines of the greatest quality which have merited international awards and top points in the ranking of all-mighty critic Robert Parker (L’Ermitá, D.O. Priorat; Termanthia, D.O. Toro; as for whites Pazo de Señorans, D.O. Rias Baixas often called after the predominant grape Albariño; Palacio de Bornos, D.O. Rueda; not to forget sparkling wines such as Juve & Camps Milesime, D.O. Cava, or sweet wines such as Alvear PX 1927, D.O. Montilla-Moriles but most often referred to, as far as sweet wines go, by the name of the grape Pedro Ximenez). Others lack such prominent names in their ranks and have as best selling point their offering good value for money.

Wine producers who cannot be bothered or don’t have the means to follow the tight rules of a DO may choose to sell their wines as ‘Vino de la Tierra’ (country wine), so you can find Vino de la Tierra de Castilla y León or Vino de la Tierra de Aragón, for example. These wider umbrellas have more loosen requirements but still offer some sort of quality-assurance for the buyer.

On the opposite extreme, some really fine wines are produced outside any DO because their designers decided the conditions set by the regulating council were not optimum to produce the wine they had in mind, or because the vineyards happen to be located just outside the geographical boundaries of the DO. As a notable example, the marquis of Griñón has recently managed to be granted a “Denominación de vino de pago” (sort of a microDO for his own vineyard) under the name Dominio de Valdepusa.

KAHLÚA Commercial – Spanish Intrigue

The latest Kahlúa Delicioso commercial featuring Ana de la Reguera.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Finding your Way Among Spanish Wines

So, you have asked for the restaurant’s wine list (or were handled one by default) and now need find your way on it… not that hard, really. The first thing you’ll notice is that the list is divided, after the gross Blancos/Tintos (white/red), in sections headed by a name that seems to be some sort of geographical indication, and indeed it is (some sort). They are what we call Denominación de Origen (Designation of Origin). In this regulated world, for a wine to be ascribed to a particular Denominación de Origen, it has to come from within precise geographical boundaries and also abide to some rules set by the regulating council that controls the DO. These indicate which kind of grapes can be used (the varieties of grape are not always indicated in the label, probably because they can be easily inferred from the DO), the techniques and processes allowed or not to grow the grapes and produce the wines, etc. (they go as far as to put limits to the yields achieved, so excess wine cannot be labelled under the DO). That way, a certain homogeneity in quality and style of the wine can be assured so you know what to expect when ordering a Rioja or a Ribera del Duero (often called in short a Ribera). Real aficionados rely more on the producer than on the DO, though. Rioja and Ribera del Duero are probably the best-known Spanish DOs. Rioja used to be almost a synonymous of Spanish quality wine, and Ribera del Duero has grown in the last 25 years as a solid alternative. Both use basically the same red grape, called Tempranillo in Rioja and Tinta Fina en Ribera del Duero. Between the two of them accumulate a myriad of prices and recognitions and host already mythical wines such as Vega Sicilia Único (R. del Duero), Marqués de Murrieta Ygay (Rioja) or Pingus (R. del Duero, the Spanish wine with the most expensive tag).They are certainly not the only ones, though. Spain counts 64 Denominaciones de Origen in which mainly red but also white wines (as well as some rosés) are produced. Some may be less widely know because of their smaller production but give wines of the greatest quality which have merited international awards and top points in the ranking of all-mighty critic Robert Parker (L’Ermitá, D.O. Priorat; Termanthia, D.O. Toro; as for whites Pazo de Señorans, D.O. Rias Baixas often called after the predominant grape Albariño; Palacio de Bornos, D.O. Rueda; not to forget sparkling wines such as Juve & Camps Milesime, D.O. Cava, or sweet wines such as Alvear PX 1927, D.O. Montilla-Moriles but most often referred to, as far as sweet wines go, by the name of the grape Pedro Ximenez). Others lack such prominent names in their ranks and have as best selling point their offering good value for money. Wine producers who cannot be bothered or don’t have the means to follow the tight rules of a DO may choose to sell their wines as ‘Vino de la Tierra’ (country wine), so you can find Vino de la Tierra de Castilla y León or Vino de la Tierra de Aragón, for example. These wider umbrellas have more loosen requirements but still offer some sort of quality-assurance for the buyer. On the opposite extreme, some really fine wines are produced outside any DO because their designers decided the conditions set by the regulating council were not optimum to produce the wine they had in mind, or because the vineyards happen to be located just outside the geographical boundaries of the DO. As a notable example, the marquis of Griñón has recently managed to be granted a “Denominación de vino de pago” (sort of a microDO for his own vineyard) under the name Dominio de Valdepusa.