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Stop Saying These 12 Things About Wine

It’s high time that people stop saying these 12 things about wine.

Sooner or later in your wine journey, you’re going to come across, shall we say, certain people: certain people who say certain things. They may be going for refined, but we both know they’re coming off as something else. Let them say their piece, pity them quietly, and be content in taking the high road.

  • only-drink-cabernet-comic-winefolly

    1. “I only drink…”

    “I only drink…” / “I don’t drink…”

    There’s no way this sentence ever ends well. The world of wine is so big! There are over 1,400 identified grape varieties and thousands of unique wine regions. Why anyone would limit themselves to just a tiny fraction of it, simply doesn’t make sense. Maybe it’s no big thing, though. They could be in a wine phase and not even know it!


  • txakolina-comic-winefolly

    2. “Actually, it’s pronounced…”

    Pronouncing Alicante Bouschet, Gewürztraminer, and Txakoli (or Txakolina) without breaking a sweat is pretty cool. But you know what’s even cooler? Not giving people a hard time if they pronounce it wrong! (Lord knows we didn’t do it right on our first try.)


  • riesling-blues-bros-resevoir-dogs-illustration-winefolly

    3. “Sweet wines? What are you, five?”

    We’re adults. And, adults can enjoy wines like Port, Sauternes, and Tokaji Aszú—sweet wines that rank among the most complex and revered wines on this planet! Yes, the wines that get most people into the world of wine in the first place tend to be sweet, so we see where that “beginners only” mentality comes from. Funny how that changes the further you get in your wine journey…


  • 4. “Ew, screw cap wines. Pass.”

    The wines of Australia and New Zealand are almost exclusively stoppered with screw caps. Take it from us, they are producing some effing dynamite stuff. Plus, screw caps have shown to age wines just fine (in fact, you don’t even have to store the bottle on it’s side). Why would someone let a flimsy, unfounded closure preference prevent them from tasting great wines? Tsk tsk.

    Learn more about the difference between corks and screw caps.


  • aged-white-wine-comic-winefolly

    5. “Pssh. White wines aren’t meant for aging.”

    Sure, most white wines aren’t meant for long storage (but neither are most red wines for that matter!). However, when you get to top-tier Champagne, White Bordeaux, White Burgundy, White Rioja, Italian Soave, and German Riesling, you’ll discover they develop some surprisingly rich and luscious flavors with a little bit of age.


  • no-love-for-merlot-comic-winefolly

    6. “I’m not drinking any #$ &@ing Merlot!”

    OK. Even now, this is still a very funny scene and quote. But what isn’t funny is dismissing some of the world’s greatest and most acclaimed wines for no good reason! Also, if this is said in reference to Sideways, the ironic inside secret was that Miles lusted after a bottle of 1961 Chateau Cheval Blanc, which is a Merlot blend from St. Emilion. See? Even Miles loves Merlot!

    (Also, if you’re still saying this, you should definitely watch some newer movies about wine. Some of them have been pretty great. Just sayin’.)


  • champagne-is-a-region-winefolly-comic-illustration

    7. “Champagne isn’t Champagne unless it’s from the region.”

    While it’s true that Champagne can only come from Champagne, it’s been the universal word for sparkling wine for beginners for a long time. So instead of clobbering your compatriots with knowledge bombs, let them taste first and learn later. The sparkling wine might actually help smooth things over. They’ll get there, and we can all help.


  • red-wine-and-fish-illustration-comic-winefolly

    8. “You never, ever pair red wine with fish.”

    We believe we speak for Pinot Noir, Gamay, and Beaujolais when we say, “Excuse moi?”

    Read more about pairing wine with fish here.


  • tasting-leather-in-wine-comic-winefolly

    9. “How do you know it tastes like _______?”

    “Have you ever eaten a baseball glove? Doubt it.”

    A signature note of aged Tempranillo, and one that’s echoed by wine experts worldwide, is leather. Do these wine experts sit around gnawing on baseball gloves and the sides of couches? We doubt it. (But you never know.)

    We often encourage people to taste not only wine, but any number of things, be it vegetables, animals, and minerals, to expand their palate. But there’s no denying it: smell has a gigantic impact on taste. For the things we haven’t yet tasted, we’ll naturally try to relate them the best we can. That relation typically comes in the form of smell.


  • all-i-get-is-wine-comic-winefolly

    10. “You’re not getting all that acid/tannin? Ugh, it’s so obvious.”

    Oof, bad form. Detecting primary flavors is hard enough. Learning how to detect and describe acid and tannin is whole new ball game. What do productive members of wine society do? That’s right – emulate your grandma. If someone is looking adrift or openly lost, gently educate, rather than flagellate.


  • red-wine-comic-winefolly

    11. “There’s only one kind of wine: red.”

    Sing the praises of bold red wines all you want. We’ll join along. Right after we sing the praises for Viognier, Assyrtiko, and Albariño. All are great; all in different ways.


  • 12. “This wine tastes like morning mist, rolling down the hillsides, transforming into dewdrops on the grass…” 

    Not a half-bad tasting note, but let’s pump the brakes. We’re talking about wine, not writing the sequel to The Leaves of Grass! Now, there’s no wrong answer when it comes to taste and it’s important to remember feelings and sensations when drinking. But, it’s also equally important to put wine experiences into something that can be quantified—real tastes, real flavors. Wine is still a product and each has a specific flavor that can be (more or less) defined.

    Want to write useful wine notes? Check out this guide.

  • By Vincent Rendoni
    I’m a spicy meatball who loves light-bodied reds, aromatic whites, video games, and for better or worse, Seattle sports teams. I was a huge fan of Wine Folly before being hired, so I guess you could say I’m living the dream.

    Love Beer? Then You’re Gonna Love These Wines

    32 wines for beer lovers. 32 beers for wine lovers. Everybody wins with this comprehensive guide.

    We’re not just wine geeks at Wine Folly, we’re beer geeks, too! Why wouldn’t we love beer? Much like wine, there’s a rich history behind the drink, endless variations and styles, and countless flavor compounds to sift through.

    Also, most importantly, it just tastes good. Like, really good.

    If you’re a beer drinker looking to make the jump from the taproom to the tasting room—or a wine drinker looking to do vice versa—this is the read for you.

    32 Wines for Beer Lovers

     
    Crisp Clean and Light beers: Bitburger Pilsner, New Glarus Spotted Cow, Weihenstephener Brauweisse, Avery White Rascal, Reissdorf Kolsch, Delirium Tremens

    Crisp, Clean, & Light

    Lager & Pilsner

    • Example: Czechvar Budvar, Bitburger Pilsner
    • Typical Flavors: malt, baked bread, mineral water, fresh flowers, grain
    • Wine to Try: Cava (Brut Nature)

    Lovers of all things light, crisp, and refreshing need to trade in their steins for a flute of Cava Brut Nature. This extra bright, extra dry Spanish sparkler is an affordable, approachable gateway into the world of wine and pairs well with all manner of salty pub fare.


    Cream Ale

    • Example: New Glarus Spotted Cow
    • Typical Flavors: corn, malt, lactose, cream soda, coconut
    • Wine to Try: Muscadet et Sur Lie

    Made from the fruity, acidic Melon de Bourgogne variety and aged on suspended dead yeast particles, this style of Muscadet develops a more robust and bready character that’s an easy entry point for lovers of the thirst-quenching ale.


    Hefeweizen

    • Example: Weihenstephaner Bräuweisse
    • Typical Flavors: banana, bubblegum, citrus, cream, clove
    • Wines to Try: Beaujolais, Schiava

    If you love the more classic banana esters found in German Hefeweizen, you’ll find a similar flavor (and easy-drinking structure) in a younger Beaujolais. However, if you dig more of the bubblegum notes, you may want to say buongiorno to the obscure Italian grape, Schiava.


    Witbier

    • Example: Avery White Rascal
    • Typical Flavors: coriander, orange peel, white tea, honey
    • Wine to Try: Gewürztraminer (Dry)

    Only one wine comes to mind for the cloudy, quaffable Belgian-style ale with a spice-driven kick: Gewürztraminer. Preferably a dry, somewhat aged one to get not only those citrus and floral notes, but a hint of warm spice as well. Much like Witbier, Gewürztraminer also pairs well with Indian and Arabic cuisine and more exotic fare.


    Kölsch

    Consider in lieu of this clean, pleasantly bitter ale from Cologne, Germany a Brut or Extra-Dry Prosecco. The drier Brut will have a similar mouthfeel and finish to most Kölsch, but if you’re all about those cracker and bread flavors, go for the somewhat sweeter, misleadingly named Extra Dry style.


    Belgian Golden Strong Ale

    • Example: Delirium Tremens
    • Typical Flavors: white spice, citrus, flowers, hops
    • Wine to Try: Grenache Blanc

    Nicknamed the “Devil’s Ale” in Belgium, these beers earn their reputation by looking as light as a lager does, while packing a graceful, but significant alcoholic punch (7-12% ABV.) Grenache Blanc does a similar dance by also looking light and approachable, while having a similar hidden kick (13-15% ABV.) Plus, these wines can be just as fruity and floral as a Belgian Strong Pale Ale, and even a bit hop-like with the characteristic green notes!


    Malty, Medium-bodied, hoppy beers: Troegs Nugget Nectar, Samuel Smiths Brown Ale, Ayinger Celebrator Doppelbock, Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, Bells Two-Hearted IPA

    Malty, Medium-Bodied, & Hoppy

    Amber Ale / Red Ale

    • Example: Tröegs Nugget Nectar
    • Typical Flavors: malt, caramel, whole wheat bread, mild fruit
    • Wine to Try: Sherry (Amontillado)

    Time to get fortified. It is difficult to find a wine that’s on the same wavelength as the occasionally hoppy, malt-forward Amber/Red Ale. In making the correlation, our minds went right to Sherry, more specifically, Amontillado Sherry, for its nuttiness, richness, and fine oxidized flavors. Just make sure you pour yourself a smaller glass with that elevated ABV!


    Brown Ale

    • Example: Samuel Smith’s Brown Ale
    • Typical Flavors: earth, dark fruit, caramel, biscuit, dark spice
    • Wine to Try: Teroldego

    Big on the browns? We’re going to give you an hip variety to consider: Teroldego. This Northern Italian red grape is known for making dark, bitter, and balanced wines with earthy and flowery backbones. As it’s known for being somewhat astringent, it’s not the smoothest of parallels to brown ale, but we’re banking that like us, you’re all about those earthy flavors.


    Bock

    • Example: Ayinger Celebrator Doppelbock
    • Typical Flavors: plum, crystallized fruit, molasses
    • Wine to Try: Malbec

    This thicker-than-your-average lager begs for a bolder wine. Plummy, dark, and full-bodied, you’ll have no problem swapping one out for a smooth Argentine Malbec.


    Pale Ale

    Get the clean and grassy flavors you crave with Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand, Loire Valley, and Chile. Trust us, it’s like taking in a freshly mowed lawn. If there’s a wine that is certain to turn you from a budding hop head to a serious white wine enthusiast, this just might be it…

    Pro-Tip: If you’ve already experienced the unreal Pale Ale-Sauvignon Blanc connection, make the leap to lean Vermentino from Sardinia or springy Soave Classico.


    India Pale Ale

    Hopheads and New England-style obsessives, please bring your attention to Grüner Veltliner. This Austrian variety is known for producing dry, acidic, citrus-driven wines that have been known to make IPA drinkers say, “Whoa.” Careful, one sip and you may never go back to drinking beer again…

    Pro-Tip: If Grüner is just a little too hard to find, snap up a nice dry Riesling and join us in wondering how anyone can not love this grape.


    Dark Beer Wine Alternatives: Deschutes Black Butte Porter, Guinness Stout, North Coast Thelonious Monk, Orkney Skullsplitter, Great Lakes Christmas Ale

    Succumb to the Dark Side

    Porter

    • Example: Deschutes Black Butte Porter
    • Typical Flavors: coffee, bittersweet chocolate, smoke, black bread
    • Wine to Try: Sagrantino

    Bitter, swarthy, palatable…wait, are we describing your modern-day Porter or Sagrantino? However, consider yourself warned: you may find the beer to be a bit of an easier drink. Sagrantino di Montefalco makes for one of the most tannic wines on the planet! Your mouth may not know what hit it.


    Stout

    Known for gravelly soils and Cabernet Sauvignon-dominant red wines, the Left Bank is where you want to look when switching from stout, specifically the Médoc region. The wines from this section of Bordeaux are known for being bold, concentrated, and filled with complex secondary aromas/flavors (cigar box, leather, tobacco) that will be music to any stout lover’s, uh, mouth.


    Dubbel & Belgian Dark Strong Ale

    The Dubbel and Belgian Dark Strong Ale can be considerably different beer styles, and normally we wouldn’t loop them together. The problem here is that we found the perfect wine to hit all those delicious dark sugar, plum, and date flavors on the nose: Port. Specifically, Ruby and Late Bottle Vintage styles that are more fruit-forward, affordable, and meant to be enjoyed young.


    Scotch Ale / Wee Heavy

    • Example: Orkney Skullsplitter
    • Typical Flavors: caramel, malt, peat, tea, heather
    • Wine to Try: Cognac (V.S.)

    As Scotch Ales are smooth, malty, and beg to be savored instead of quickly thrown back, we recommend reaching for a younger V.S. (Very Special) Cognac. With notes of caramel, toffee, leather, coconut, and spice notes, Cognac is pretty much guaranteed to be your thing. Get the right glassware, swirl, and enjoy. Maybe even get a mirror to see how cool you look as you drink it.


    Winter Warmer / Christmas Ale

    • Example: Great Lakes Christmas Ale
    • Typical Flavors: cinnamon, orange peel, vanilla, cloves
    • Wine to Try: Mulled Wine/Glühwein

    Beer drinkers use winter warmers to get through the cold season. Wine drinkers use Glühwein. Why not drink both? If you’re looking to make your own from scratch, go with a full-bodied red wine like Syrah or Malbec.


    High ABV Alcohol Beer and wine alternatives: Tripel Karmeliet, Alchemist Heady Topper, North Coast Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout, Goose Island Bourbon, Trappistes Rochefort 10, Great Divide Old Ruffian

    High-ABV Territory

    Tripel

    Golden, dense, and complex, the singular Tripel is one of our favorite beers here. Gorgeous as it may be, it needs to be consumed with some caution. Much like the Belgian Golden Strong Ale, it looks deceivingly light, but packs enough of an alcoholic punch to cut a night out short. So if you’re craving those sweeter, fruitier flavors and a similar creamy mouthfeel, consider a lower-octane Rosé Sparkling Wine, either domestic or from France’s Cremant stylings.

    Pro-Tip: Cost not an issue? Investigate nuttier, breadier, and oh-so-decadent Vintage Champagne. Yes, it could break your budget. But it will also break your brain (in a good way.)


    Double/Imperial India Pale Ale

    • Example: Alchemist Heady Topper
    • Typical Flavors: pine, grapefruit, tree sap, resin, cannabis
    • Wine to Try: Retsina

    Grüner Veltliner and Dry Riesling will still do the trick for most IPAs, but if you like them extra dank and sticky, we’re gonna send you in Retsina’s general direction. This Greek wine isn’t for the faint of the heart (even for those who love wine), with its pine, resin, and lime peel flavor profile. But hey, if you love DIPA/IIPAs, we probably had you at “not for the faint of heart!”


    Double/Imperial/Russian Stout

    • Example: North Coast Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout
    • Typical Flavors: strong coffee/espresso, burnt sugar, hearty oats, dried dark fruit
    • Wine to Try: Australian Shiraz

    Big, brawny, and known for its aggressive flavor profile, this souped-up stout needs something that’s equally broad-shouldered. Enter Aged Australian Shiraz. Rugged and animalistic, this style of Syrah features flavors of mocha, graphite, savory meat, as well as a high alcohol content thanks to the abundant Down Under sunshine.


    Bourbon-Barrel-Aged Stout

    • Example: Goose Island Bourbon County Stout
    • Typical Flavors: bourbon, wood, burnt sugar, vanilla, fudge, char
    • Wine to Try: Sherry (Oloroso)

    Expensive to produce and requiring some serious patience to brew, the Bourbon Barrel-Aged Stout is often the gem in any beer enthusiast’s cellar. They’re rich, complex, and one of the surest bets to get better with age. For wines, Oloroso, the beautiful mistake of the Sherry business, is a great go-to. Occasionally, the flor (a special yeast used to make Sherry) dies, and then that Sherry is taken into barrels to age. The end result is a deep, dark, and dry fortified wine with parallel wood, fudge, and burnt vanilla notes.


    Quadrupel

    • Example: Trappistes Rochefort 10
    • Typical Flavors: raisins, dates, fruitcake, gingerbread, earth, anise
    • Wine to Try: Sherry (Pedro Ximénez)

    The brawny, yet delectable Quadrupel may have fit under the “Belgian Dark Strong Ale” umbrella, but we found that in our experiences with Rochefort and Westvleteren, we got something even a little more heavy. After we nailed down flavors of fruitcake, raisins, and even some gingerbread, we thought there was a better fit than Port. Syrupy Pedro Ximénez (a grape, not a person) Sherry won our hearts with its luscious profile of figs, dates, and fireside spices.


    Old Ale & Barleywine

    • Example: Great Divide Old Ruffian Barleywine
    • Typical Flavors: alcohol, English toffee, treacle, hard candy, butterscotch
    • Wine to Try: Madeira (Bual)

    There’s nothing subtle about Barleywine or even Old Ale, its more sessionable equivalent. There’s often not even an attempt to hide the alcohol and it is absolutely thick with fruity esters, malts (English) and hops (American.) The fortified Portuguese island wine, Madeira, is a great go-to with its flavors of roasted nuts, stewed fruit, and toffee. We especially like the sweeter Bual style with its additional salted caramel, golden raisin, and date smells and tastes.


    Sour Funky Beers Saison-dupont-Gueuze Tilquin, Lindemans Framboise Lambic, Duchesse de Bourgogne

    Sour ‘n’ Funky

    Saison / Farmhouse Ale

    Ooh, tough call. There can be quite a range in tastes when it comes to Saison, but we’ve got some good options for one of our personal favorite styles of beer. If you like the more peppery style of Saison, consider Rosé of Tempranillo or Syrah. You’ll find these specific styles of rosé more herbaceous and savory, rather than abundantly fruity.

    Pro-Tip: If you’re all about the farmhouse funk/brettanomyces in your beer, you might be game for a more untamed natural wine (wine made with minimal human interaction.)


    Sour (Gueuze, Gose, & Berlinerweisse)

    • Example: Gueuze Tilquin
    • Typical Flavors: lemon juice, lime peel, grape must, apple cider, salt
    • Wine to Try: Orange Wine

    This one is a no-brainer. Orange wine, which is white wine made by keeping the skin and seeds in contact with the juice, is designed for the sour beer lover. It’s acidic, tart, and assertive with atypical aromas and flavors (jackfruit, linseed oil, brazil nuts, sourdough). Sound like any beer you know?


    Fruit Lambic

    If you enjoy fruit lambic beers (Kriek, Cassis, Framboise), then you should, nay, MUST try Lambrusco. This sparkling red wine comes in a range of dry and off-dry styles, but always with up-front fruit flavors. Depending on the style, you can even find some additional cream, chocolate, and floral notes! Who can resist?

    Pro-Tip: Made the Lambic-Lambrusco connection? Dig a Beaujolais Nouveau! (Bojo Nouveau, if you’re nasty.) This ultra-acidic, quickly-made wine features lush, juicy aromas of raspberry, cranberry, candied fruits, banana, and even bubblegum.


    Flanders Red Ale & Oud Bruin

    • Example: Duchesse de Bourgogne
    • Typical Flavors: green apple, balsamic vinegar, sour grapes, oxidized fruit
    • Wine to Try: Blanquette de Limoux / Mauzac

    With strong vinegar, green apple, and earthy flavors, these two sours can be a bit of a curveball to the uninitiated. Fortunately, the wine we’re recommending is way more accessible, if but a bit overlooked! We submit to you: Blanquette de Limoux, a dry style of sparkling wine from France’s Languedoc-Roussillon region that prominently features the ancient, esoteric Mauzac Blanc variety. Peachy, grassy, and flush with green apple notes, you best be getting to your local wine shop right now.


    Weird Beers and Wine Alternatives: Schneider Weisse Tap 6 Unser, Wookey Jack, Black Boss Porter, Dogfish Head Sah’Tea, Marooned on Hog Island, Rauchbier,

    Let’s Get a Little Weird

    Weizenbock

    • Example: Schneider Weisse Tap 6 Unser Aventinus
    • Typical Flavors: vanilla, clove, malt, nutmeg, cinnamon
    • Wine to Try: Vin Santo

    Fans of this malty, ester-apparent, bock-strength Dunkelweizen should seek out Vin Santo, an intriguing Italian dessert wine known for its vanilla, caramel, honey hazelnut, and dried apricot flavors. Like Weizenbock, it’s a wondrous balance of deliciousness and intensity that will stick to the side of your glass. Drink up.


    Cascadian Dark Ale / Black IPA

    • Example: Firestone Walker Wookey Jack
    • Typical Flavors: coffee grounds, lime peel, tree resin, roasted grain
    • Wine to Try: Carménère

    Already a beautiful blend of the fruity, sweet, and bitter, this dark-grained IPA is a little more smoky and complex. (Best description? Like a lime squeezed into a cup of coffee. Yum.) Savory, herbaceous, and equally fruity South American Carménère might be just what you’re looking for.


    Baltic Porter

    Originally designed to withstand colder climates and conditions, these lagers (yes, they’re bottom-fermenting!) have all the body, alcohol, and flavors you’ve come to expect from heavier stouts — with a little something extra. Something so hearty, so brooding needs a wine to match. That’s why our hive mind went to Aglianico, a full-bodied, high-tannin red wine with notes of smoke, game, and spiced fruit. Aglianico del Taburno and Aglianico del Vulture make for great, affordable gateway wines.

    Pro-Tip: While we doubt we can convince anyone to switch out their Baltic Porter (~$ 8) for the rich and heady Amarone della Valpolicella ($ 50 ) of lore, if you’ve got the money, go for it.


    Sahti

    • Example: Dogfish Head Sah’Tea
    • Typical Flavors: juniper, resin, peppercorn, cardamon, twigs
    • Wine to Try: Vermouth

    Boasting an aromatic head and broad-shouldered body, this primitive Finnish beer is a unique treat. We’re going to assume if you’re crazy about Sahti, you’re probably crazy about its signature juniper character. That calls for Vermouth. Open and shut case.


    Oyster Stout

    • Example: 21st Amendment Marooned on Hog Island
    • Typical Flavors: mollusk, brine, sea salt, dark grain
    • Wine to Try: Muscadet

    Dry stouts make for a hell of a pairing with shellfish. They also make for a hell of a pairing in the beer itself, giving a briny and saline character to a dark, easy-drinking brew. Recommending a light, refreshing white wine like Muscadet feels like a far cry from a black ale—that is until you realize it too is dry, saline, and goes great with the treasures of the sea.


    Rauchbier

    There’s a lot of drinks that could be described as smoky, but few are as in your face about it as a Rauchbier. It’s not just smoky, either. It’s also spicy, savory, and meaty with some people even noting a bacon flavor! The smoke and leather of an aged Rioja sounds like an excellent substitute, but you’d also do well with an Old World Syrah and its earth and bacon-fat characteristics.


    Last word: Did we miss your favorite style of beer? Looking for a wine to pair with it? Let us know in the comments and we’ll try to work our recommendation magic!


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    By Vincent Rendoni
    I’m a spicy meatball who loves light-bodied reds, aromatic whites, video games, and for better or worse, Seattle sports teams. I was a huge fan of Wine Folly before being hired, so I guess you could say I’m living the dream.

    Take The Bar To Your House With These Simple Cocktail Concoctions

    Are you a bar aficionado? Are you planning to bring the bar right at the comfort of your own dwelling and have fun with your friends without the bill? No need to think too much because all you have to do is set up an area in your place like a cocktail bar, acquire custom promotional cups and glasswares, get some booze and have fun. If you are nave on which cocktail drink to serve and what type of glass or cup to utilize, here is a short list that you might consider.

    Cosmopolitan

    You need: 4.0 cl Vodka Citron, 1.5 cl Cointreau, 1.5 cl Fresh Lime juice, 3.0 cl Cranberry juice

    Combine all ingredients and in a cocktail shaker and shake thoroughly. Just pour it in a personalized promotional cup like a martini glass and garnish with a wedge of lime.

    Sex on the Beach

    2 parts (4.0 cl) Vodka, 1 parts (2.0 cl) Peach Schnapps, 2 parts (4.0 cl) Orange juice, 2 parts (4.0 cl) Cranberry juice

    Feel the thrill of this luscious combination by building all ingredients on a highball glass filled with ice cube. Just put an orange slice on top and you’re on the big O without the sexual encounter.

    Daquiri

    9 parts (4.5cl) White Rum, 4 parts (2 cl ) Lime Juice, 1 part (0.5 cl) Gomme Syrup

    Named after a Cuban village, blending daiquiri will definitely supply you more that just a Cuban feel. Just combine all ingredients on in a cocktail shaker with ice cubes and strain chilled in a cocktail glass.

    Pina Colada

    1 part (3cl) White Rum, 1 part (3cl) Cream of Coconut, 3 parts (9cl) Pineapple Juice

    Have a taste of Puerto Rico’s official beverage right at the comfort of your own house. Just mix everything with crushed ice until all ingredients were entirely blended creating a smooth consistency. You can use a goblet, hurricane, tiki or pint as your custom printed promotional cup or glassware.

    Mai Tai

    6 parts (3cl) White Rum, 3 parts (1.5cl) Orange Curacao, 3 parts (1.5cl) Orgeat Syrup, 1 part (0.5cl) Rock Candy Syrup, 2 parts (1cl) Fresh lime juice, 6 parts (3cl) Dark rum

    Have a taste of Mai Tai by mixing all the ingredients without the dark rum in a cocktail mixer. Pour in highball glass and float the dark rum.

    If you truly desire to make your home bar tremendously personalized, just emboss these custom promotional cups and glasswares with a logo that you have created. Invite friends and allow them to experience chill out party all at the comfort of your home.

    Bring The Bar To Your House With These Simple Cocktail Concoctions

    Article by Beth Loggins

    Are you a bar aficionado? Are you planning to bring the bar right at the comfort of your own house and have fun with your friends devoid of the bill? No need to worry because all you have to do is set up an area in your residence like a cocktail bar, get custom promotional cups and glasswares, have some alcohol and have fun. If you are oblivious on which cocktail mix to serve and what kind of glass or cup to use, here is a short list that you might ponder upon.

    Cosmopolitan

    You need: 4.0 cl Vodka Citron, 1.5 cl Cointreau, 1.5 cl Fresh Lime juice, 3.0 cl Cranberry juice

    Combine all ingredients and in a cocktail shaker and shake thoroughly. Just strain it in a customized promotional cup like a martini glass and garnish with a wedge of lime.

    Sex on the Beach

    2 parts (4.0 cl) Vodka, 1 parts (2.0 cl) Peach Schnapps, 2 parts (4.0 cl) Orange juice, 2 parts (4.0 cl) Cranberry juice

    Sense the thrill of this delectable mix by building all ingredients on a highball glass filled with ice cube. Just put an orange slice on top and you’re on the big O devoid of the sexual encounter.

    Daquiri

    9 parts (4.5cl) White Rum, 4 parts (2 cl ) Lime Juice, 1 part (0.5 cl) Gomme Syrup

    Named after a Cuban village, blending daiquiri will undoubtedly supply you more that just a Cuban feel. Just mix all ingredients on in a cocktail shaker with ice cubes and strain chilled in a cocktail glass.

    Pina Colada

    1 part (3cl) White Rum, 1 part (3cl) Cream of Coconut, 3 parts (9cl) Pineapple Juice

    Have a taste of Puerto Rico’s official beverage right at the comfort of your own home. Simply combine everything with crushed ice until all ingredients were entirely blended making a smooth consistency. You can use a goblet, hurricane, tiki or pint as your custom promotional cup or glassware.

    Mai Tai

    6 parts (3cl) White Rum, 3 parts (1.5cl) Orange Curacao, 3 parts (1.5cl) Orgeat Syrup, 1 part (0.5cl) Rock Candy Syrup, 2 parts (1cl) Fresh lime juice, 6 parts (3cl) Dark rum

    Get a taste of Mai Tai by mixing all the ingredients without the dark rum in a cocktail mixer. Strain in highball glass and float the dark rum.

    If you truly desire to make your home bar tremendously personalized, just emboss these custom promotional cups and glasswares with a logo that you have sketched. Invite friends and permit them to experience chill out party all at the comfort of your home.

    Avoid These 5 Cocktails And You Will Stay Looking Great

    Article by Paul Atkins

    When it’s time to have a drink it’s time to have a drink. The problem with that though is that many drinks are just plain not good for you. Never mind if you’re on a diet plan and trying to lose weight these 5 are the cream of the crop when it comes to calories, sugar, and just plain old bad stuff you don’t want to have floating around inside you.

    Not only do these types of drinks wreck your system and help fluctuate your sugar levels up and down faster than a bobble head they tend to always be the ones that leave you with that wonderful early-morning hangover headache that always seems to come at the worst possible time. It’s also a good idea to keep in mind that the drinks mentioned in this article are ones that are very popular. This is important because your odds of running into them are high. These drinks tend to be the ones that are more socially inclined and lend themselves to large groups of people who will more than likely want you to drink them with everyone.

    To start things off let’s begin by discussing how a tea from long island is anything but a tea and actually not from long island either. The long island iced tea is not teaming with antioxidants but rather a concoction of five different hard liquors as well as sweet and sour mix and Coke. All mighty fine ingredients you want in a drink when you’re trying to lose weight and get fit, not really.

    Next on our list would be the newest bad alcoholic concoction the infamous red bull and vodka. This drink seems to be popular among the youth and occasionally among the older. Who knows why this particular drink has become such a craze maybe it’s because of the fancy red bull cars driving around with their giant cans strapped to the roof or maybe it’s the annual flugtag festival of idiots driving their homemade cars off a ramp into giant lakes sending everyone into a frenzy. Whatever the case the person who decided to combine these two drinks deserves to win the worlds worst drink combination award.

    I say this because only the supercharged college age drunk who desires nothing more than the worst hangover in the morning or the inability to sleep is really who’s right for this particular drink. Granted there is a positive side to this drink which is when you drink them you’re so stupidly energized you might bounce off the walls enough for hours to burn a few of those ridiculous amount of calories you just ingested.

    A favorite drink of mine is an unfortunate part of this list, the redneck’s drink of choice a Jack and Coke. As much as i hate to admit it this particular cocktail us fully loaded in an unfortunately bad way. A little bit of Jack on the rocks is no biggie, but throw in that Coke and the whole ball game changes. There is a bright spot in the whole Jack and Coke saga which is those that generally drink this cocktail usually end up in a pretty serious brawl outside the local bar which is a great way to get rid of a few extra calories you just drank.

    Numero 4 on the list of most offensive cocktails to the health nut or fitness buff is the anti-typical pool bar / Tiki hut drink the Pina colada. This drink tends to have not just have ridiculous amount of calories and sugar all swirled together in a lovely delicious dessert like cocktail but usually comes with a boatload of fat as well. The ending result is that of an alcoholic milkshake that comes close to surpassing the calories of a whopper with cheese. In fact you might actually be better off ordering a whopper with cheese and go ahead and throw some fries into the mix from the pool bar over this fourth offender.

    Last but not least on our list of worst offenders is the scorpion. The scorpion is a favorite drink of those who are throwing tropical themed pool parties or some other equally ridiculous themed event. There’s not much worse than throwing together a lot of sugary-based alcohol’s and serving them up, other than of course serving them up with a lot of sugary-based juices in a giant bowl shaped glass that contains six draws. A couple of these babies and you wonder where the roasted pig went and end up face down in the toilet.

    A well-prepared and proactive person who has their defenses up before the party or vacation begins will prevent disaster from happening. These 5 calorie and sugar rich cocktails are definitely the ones that need to be avoided at all times. Staying from these drinks and not making stupid health decisions will help you stay on track and protect you from taking several steps backwards in regards to all the weight-loss and fitness progress you’ve made so far.

    A strong drink is great and sometimes just plain needed, just make sure it doesn’t kill the progress you’ve made with your workout routines. A 90 day exercise routine that is a heck of a workout but also enjoyable is P90X by Beachbody, a personal favorite of mine.